When you shopping on GearBest.com, you should know that GearBest is not responsible for any tax invoice charged on its products. Thus, tax duty is one of an important thing we should consider when buying from GearBest. This post is an overview of the most important information on this subject.

When to Pay Taxes & Duties?

Things you buy over the internet from a China vendors (e.g. GearBest.com) will have the same rules, duties and screening processes applied as any other import. The general rule is:

Imports of products valued up to AU$1000 are exempt from custom duties, GST and Import Processing Charge. In other words, you don’t have to pay duty and taxes on goods (excluding tobacco, tobacco products and alcohol) with a value of under 1,000$AU.

When goods value is more than AU$1000, the GST applies to most products imported from China to Australia, currently at 10%. And it’s subject to an Import Processing Charge that is usually in the range of AU$40 – 50.

Goods arriving by post do not require a SAC declaration. But if these goods arrive in Australia by air or sea cargo, they must have a Self-Assessed Clearance (SAC) Declaration. This will generally be taken care of by the cargo company. There is no charge for this declaration.

Import Limitation

Before shopping online, you should know that certain types of goods are not allowed to be brought into Australia, or else need special permits. For example: Gas and electrical goods that do not meet Australian safety and technical standards may be a serious safety risk. Those for sale online from overseas may not meet Australia’s standards. Some goods, like barbeques and personal grooming items, may not be able to be modified to meet the Australian standards.

Priority Line is a Priority

Priority line is available for some goods shipping to Australia. We recommends you to choose this type of shipping method, as it is free for taxes and save more for you.

priority-line

Customs Dusty Refund?

People may say: I paid taxes on goods I bought from GearBest but I returned them to the supplier because, “I changed my mind”, “they don’t fit”, or “I don’t like them”. Can I get a refund of the taxes?

The answer is “No”. Unfortunately, “a change of mind”, “how they fit”, or “simply not liking them”, is not a refund circumstance under the legislation. But, as an alternative option if you export the imported goods, subject to certain conditions, you may be entitled to a drawback of the duty paid.